Episode 2 – Food of the Future

Air Date: Oct. 24, 2018
Episode: Food of the Future

On today’s show we’re talking about the future of food. In recent decades, globalization has dramatically changed the way we eat. Shipping food all around the world contributes to climate change, and so does meat produced on factory farms. As the earth warms, cycles of drought and flood will threaten the grain supply. On top of all that, the number of stomachs to fill, is only growing.

IN THIS EPISODE:

1. About 30 percent of the world’s population eat insects as part of their everyday diet. Now bugs are having a moment in the NYC culinary scene.
2. Inside FoodBytes, an annual pitch competition that introduces new technology to the food sector
3. Scenes from a bratwurst eating contest
4. A conversation about fair scheduling laws

NYC “Freegan” David Emanuel talks about food waste and “dumpster diving” in the city.

Singer-songwriter Kelly Quigley performs live.

Producer: Avi Scher
Host: Comice Johnson
Assistant Producer: Matt Cutler
Music Producer: Rob Dozier
Digital Producer: Allie Weintraub
Stories by: Ariama Long, Comice Johnson, Camille Smith and Max Zahn

Music
Bass Culture Players
Wimps
Foodman
Rod Hamilton & Tiffany Seal

FEATURES
 
‘Salty Scorpions’: Insects Are Having a Culinary Moment
By Ariama Long

About 30 percent of the world’s population eat bugs as part of their everyday diet. They have more flavor than you might think. Crickets are nutty and scorpions are uncharacteristically salty. But Americans still haven’t gotten on board. Maybe, all it takes is some culinary creativity.

Inventors Pitch New Food Tech at NYC Competition
By Camille Smith

Last week, people from all over the world gathered in New York City for FoodBytes, a pitch competition that started three years ago to introduce new technology to the food industry. Nineteen start-ups took to the stage to showcase their inventions.

Scenes From a Bratwurst Eating Competition 
By Comice Johnson

Comice Johnson stops by a bratwurst eating contest at a bar in midtown called Bierhaus. Semi-professional eaters and amateurs battled for a $700 prize. The bar was packed with rowdy drinkers, who cheered enthusiastically.