Category: 2016

Live Show – RESET

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On Friday, December 9th the 2016 Audiofiles podcast class will host a live stage show. The theme of the show is RESET because sometimes we need to start all over again.

WHERE: Union Docs at 322 Union Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn 11211
TIME: Doors open at 6 pm – Show starts at 6:30 pm
COST: Free and open to the public (although seating is limited to 55 persons)

Cash Bar on the premises.

Produced by KalaLea and Guglielmo Mattioli
Assistant Producer – Stephanie Daniel
Visual Producer – Nomin Ujiyediin
Host – W. Harry Fortuna
Storytellers – Victoria Edwards, Devin Holt, Michael O’Brien, Angely Mercado and Anna Roberts
Contributors – Raul Hernandez, Brandon Nix, Meaghan Callaghan, Joanna Purpich, Joaquin Cotler and Jaja Grays

Our guests for the evening will be:

Kayhan Irani – with a live interviewed by Raul Hernandez

Copyright Jehangir Irani, 2012 www.jiniproductions.com jayirani@gmail.com

Copyright Jehangir Irani, 2012 – jiniproductions.com

Kayhan Irani is an artivist and an Emmy award winning writer. She believes in the liberating power of the arts to deepen people’s engagement with social issues and transform society. She is a writer, director, performer, and facilitator. As a performer and writer, Kayhan’s pieces magnify the relevant issues of the day. In 2010 she won a New York Emmy award for best writing for “We Are New York” a 9-episode broadcast TV drama and English language learning and civic engagement tool for immigrant New Yorkers.

MCManifes – with a live interview by Brandon Nix
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Born in New York City, MCManifes is an emcee, deejay, graffiti artist, educator who plays guitar and performs hip hop inspired by Brazilian music.

Episode 6 – Access Denied

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Air Date: Nov 23, 2016
Episode: Access Denied

Have you ever been rejected? Turned down? Forgotten? This week on AudioFiles we explore the repercussions of systems and circles that ignore and deny people. We’ll talk to undocumented immigrants living in a post-election world, disabled New Yorkers navigating the city’s public transportation, female comic book writers struggling with a male-dominated fanbase, and more. Our special guest this week will be Irene Pease, physics teacher at York College.

Producer: W. Harry Fortuna
Assistant Producer: Raul Hernandez
Hosts: Nomin Ujiyediin, Chis Inoa
Stories By: Meaghan Lee Callaghan, Joanna Purpich, Jaja Gray, Mike O’Brien, Raul Hernandez, Chris Inoa

Contributors: Brandon Nix, KalaLea, Guglielmo Mattioli

Special Guest: Irene Pease

Musical Guest: Melanie JB Charles


FEATURES

Colony decline continues to ravage bee populations
by Meaghan Lee Callaghan

Agriculture relies on free pollinators to help fertilize crops, like the honey bee. While bee populations in the U.S. and abroad have been in decline, reporter Meaghan Lee Callaghan finds out that its not just the dreaded colony collapse disorder, but a complex mix of causes hurting bees.

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Davin Larson, beekeeper at Green-Wood cemetery in Brooklyn. Photos by Maria Perez.

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How accessible is New York’s subway for disable people? Not much.
by Joanna Purpich

New York is easy to get around. Subways zip around the city, and there’s buses on almost every corner. If those don’t work, hop off and walk or hail a cab. But for disabled New Yorkers, public transit turns into a nightmare.

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Bleeding all the time
By Michael O’Brien

The rush of athletic competition can be addictive. Some athletes experience cravings so intense, psychologists compare it to drug withdrawal. Jared Gordon is a mixed martial arts fighter willing to push himself to the brink in order to get his fix.

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Episode 5 – Apocalypse

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Air Date: Nov 16, 2016
Episode: Apocalypse

This week on AudioFiles, we face the end of the world. We explore stories on those preparing for the end, or just the next natural disaster, in the big city, along with reports from protesters who think current political and environmental events are signs of impending catastrophe. And we hear from a science communicator on the likelihood of different doomsday scenarios.

Producer: Meaghan Lee Callaghan
Assistant Producer: Joanna Purpich
Hosts: Stephanie Daniel and Michael O’Brien
Stories By: Victoria Edwards, KalaLea, Angely Mercado, and Nomin Ujiyediin

Contributors: Devin Holt, Anna Roberts, and Zach Ripple

Special Guest: Ariel Conn

Musical Guest: Jen Nascimento

Photo Gallery

Episode 4 – Two Weeks’ Notice

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Air Date: Nov 9, 2016
Episode: Two Weeks’ Notice

In Two Weeks’ Notice, Audiofiles examines transition. Life is a collection of
transitions, from one phase to another, year after year. Not all transitions are from one job to another, and certainly very few of them take only two weeks. But most of us, on any given day, are in the process of ending one stage of our journey to begin another. This episode we look at that process and see how change affects us all.

Producer: Raul Hernandez
Assistant Producer: W. Harry Fortuna
Hosts: Christopher Inoa and Nomin Ujiyediin
Stories By: Stephanie Daniel, Victoria Edwards, KalaLea, Joaquin Cotler, Brandon Nix

Contributors: Zachary Ripple, Michael O’Brien, Joanna Purpich, Meaghan Lee Callaghan and KalaLea

Special Guest: Punit Arora, Assistant Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Colin Powell School of Civic and Global Leadership at the City College of New York

Musical Guest: Nicole Weiss


FEATURES

Music: more than a gateway to memories
By Stephanie Daniel

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Brooklyn – Chester and Charla sing patriotic songs, doo-wop and Irish tunes during music therapy session. (Credit: S. Daniel)

Music often defines major life events: like the first school dance, a college road trip or wedding celebration. But for a man in the twilight of life, music is more than just a gateway to great memories. It’s his voice. Reporter Stephanie Daniel has more.


Curtain Closes for Iconic Piano Bar
By Victoria Edwards

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The Manhattan Inn has hosted countless shows over the last seven years and welcomed personalities from Katy Perry to the Grizzly Bears – but this week the iconic Brooklyn piano bar is closing its curtains for good.

“This place is such a home — home to so many people and artists. It’s a family here. I was sad to lose that. It’s special and only comes around once in a blue moon,” said Rachel Pazadan, who books the musical guests at the venue.

Pazdan is not a musician, but she’s been in a big part in the musical creation that’s taken place at the venue. She hosts sessions called the “Hum” twice a week, where women rockers who don’t know each other – rock out for the first time together at the Manhattan Inn.

The Manhattan Inn is playing live music every day until it closes on November 13th.

Episode 3 – Now You See It

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Air Date: Oct 26, 2016
Episode: Now You See It

In this episode, we explore things that were overlooked at one time and brought to light because of random events. Featuring stories about the lengthy AirBnB legal battle in New York state, hidden plus-size fashion, the lost city of new Manhattan plus good clowns against bad.

Producer: Joanna Purpich
Assistant Producer: Meaghan Lee Callaghan
Music Producer: Joaquin Cotler
Hosts: Stephanie Daniel and Michael O’Brien
Stories By: Devin Holt, Nomin Ujiyediin and Jaja Grays

Contributors: W. Harry Fortuna and Guglielmo Mattioli

Musical Guest: Johnnito Cienfuegos DeLaCeiba


FEATURES

Red noses, politics and big shoes: The Great Clown Scare of 2016
By Devin Holt

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Episode 2 – Gray Matters

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Air Date: Oct 19, 2016
Episode: Gray Matters

Whether talking about the stuff between our ears, the indecision on who to vote for, or how much of our privacy we must sacrifice in order to feel safe, the areas in between the extremes are where most of life is lived, the gray areas definitely matter. This episode of Audiofiles is not about the white, nor the black, not the right or the wrong. We dig into the Gray Matters and how the things that live in the middle sometimes have unexpected consequences.

Producer: Raul Hernandez
Assistant Producer: W. Harry Fortuna
Music Producer: Jaja Grays
Hosts: Christopher Inoa and Nomin Ujiyediin
Stories By: Devin Holt, Anna Roberts, Joanna Purpich, Brandon Nix and Zachary Ripple

Contributors: Devin Holt, Anna Roberts, Joanna Purpich, Brandon Nix, Zachary Ripple, Guglielmo Mattioli and Angely Mercado

Musical Guest: Grey Reverend with Brian Baker on Trumpet


FEATURES

Zone out with the ‘get-high headphones’; New tech pushes out your brain’s happy juice
By Devin Holt

Your longest cranial nerve, that’s a nerve that originates in the brain instead of the spine, runs from your brain to your heart, stomach, lungs and other internal organs. It’s called the vagus nerve and controls various unconscious body functions like heart rate and digestion (if you’ve ever passed out at the sight of blood, that’s the vagus nerve).

Photos: Devin Holt

Sade Spence demonstrates headphones at Audio46 in Midtown Manhattan. Photos: Devin Holt

Doctors have used the vagus nerve for decades to treat depression, epilepsy and other disorders. The nerve is stimulated with small bursts of electricity, which increases production of the chemicals in your brain that regulate mood. But a wellness company called Nervana has released a headset that uses vagus nerve stimulation in a new way: to help regular people unwind after a tough day. Sound enthusiast and headphone expert Sade Spence calls them “the high headphones.”

Headphones at Audio46 in Midtown Manhattan.

Music credits: audionautix.com and Tame Impala

Shows

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Episode 1 – Revival

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Air Date: Oct 5, 2016
Episode: Revival

What does shellfish in the New York harbor, an ancient arch and bees have in common?They are all surprising signs of revival. In this episode, hear about pollution eating oysters, broken iPhones and why it’s so hard to catch a movie in the Bronx. After that, learn how 3D printing can save Syrian antiquity. We’ll also celebrate the return of one of the city’s most beloved hotdogs.

Producer: Meaghan Lee Callaghan
Assistant Producer: Joanna Purpich
Music Producer: Joaquin Cotler
Hosts: Stephanie Daniel and Brandon Nix
Stories By: Joaquin Cotler, Michael O’Brien, Christopher Inoa, Victoria Edwards and W. Harry Fortuna

Musical Guest: Hubby Jenkins


FEATURES

Oysteration
Reporter: Joaquin Cotler

The Billion Oyster Project recycles 4 tons of discarded oyster shells every week. Their efforts help to reduce waste and restore the water quality in New York harbor. They also are instrumental in the construction of “oyster reefs” to protect the coastline. These reefs also provide a habitat for hundreds of species of marine life. But their construction has been halted in New Jersey, just ten miles south, because of the condition of the water–and the fragility of the state’s $790 million seafood market.

Palmyra
Reporter: Michael O’Brien

Last September, if you happened by City Hall Park, you might have noticed a two thousand year old imperial Roman ruin. Or at least what looked a lot like a Roman Ruin. The 25-foot-tall stone arch was a replica, created using 3D printing technology. The original was destroyed by ISIS last year after they captured the ancient site of Palmyra in Syria. It was placed downtown to raise awareness of cultural destruction. But the recreation itself raises questions for conservationists about how world heritage is preserved.



New York Foodie Almost Loses Her Son To Harrowing Hot Dog Meal
by Victoria Edwards
Air Date: October 5, 2016

Native New Yorker Annie Hauck-Lawson has built her career around her culinary passion – she was a professor of health and nutrition scientists at CUNY and co-authored the book “Gastropolis: Food and New York City” – which is why it’s especially ironic that her son, Phillip, almost lost his life choking on a hotdog.

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Annie recounts the harrowing experience that rushed her and her family to Methodist Hospital 19 years ago. It’s an experience that Phillip, who was 2-years- old at the time, can no longer remember, but the rest of the family can never forget.

Still, Annie said there was a silver lining to that fateful meal: Her family became friends with the emergency team that saved her son’s life. And every year since then, Annie has had them over for dinner to show her appreciation through the one thing she knows better than anyone else – food.